Welcome!

Welcome to Renegade Kosher! My name’s Steven Garrett, and it’s my life’s mission to mix my love of kosher cooking with modern ideas. First off, I’m going to help by sharing a popular dish many friends ask for: Matzos Ball Soup. This is a traditional soup that is served at the beginning of meals. To start, we should look at the basic recipe for Matzos balls.

Matzos Balls

4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 tsp. salt
4 tbsp. cooking oil
4 tbsp. water
1 c. Matzo meal

Mix all together and let stand in refrigerator for at least 1/2 hour, longer if possible. Form into 16 balls and drop like dumplings into boiling chicken broth. Boil covered 40 minutes. Serve hot.

Now, let’s see… That’s the recipe we all grew up with. The same old soup we eat every Shabbat with Challah before dinner. Now, what if we could update this… Make it into a wonderful stew that could BE the meal! Mmm, that would be delicious! And, lucky for you, I’ve experimented some, and have come up with such a chicken stew that will make people shout out “Movel Tov!” when it’s served!

Chicken Stew with Matzos Balls

Stew Ingredients
2 T Non-Dairy Margarine

8 Boneless chicken breasts, Cut Up
1/2 Cup Diced Onions
1/2 Cup Diced Celery
2 Cloves Minced Garlic
1/4 Cup Flour
4 Cups Chicken broth
1/4 Cup Flour
1/4 t. Pepper
1 T. Minced Fresh rosemary
2 Bay leaves
1/4 Cup Minced Parsley
1 lb Fresh, Canned, or Frozen peas

Matzos Balls
4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 tsp. salt
4 tbsp. cooking oil
4 tbsp. water
1 c. Matzo meal

Taking your handy Slow Cooker, and insert a slow cooker liner. (Not needed, but it does save on cleanup.)

Mix ALL stew ingredients into Slow Cooker and cover. Cook on LOW for 6-8 hours, or HIGH for 4 hours.

Prepare Matzos Ball pre-mixture, and set in refrigerator.

ONE HOUR before preparing (Half hour if cooking on high), take mixture out of the fridge and roll into balls. It SHOULD make 16 medium-sized balls, but you can make smaller, if you wish.

Taking the balls, drop them into the Slow Cooker before strirring them in.

Recover and continue cooking for last hour.

This will create a very thick, hearty chicken stew that will feed a family of 4-6 easily. A handy meal for when you have to stretch those budgets! It’s very easy to prepare, as well, and good for fixing inbetween taking care of household chores, or coming home from a long day at work for a delicious meal!

Tune in tomorrow when I’ll be taking a look at Hawaiian Dishes, and how you can bring the islands into your home!

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January 26, 2006. main courses, recipes.

10 Comments

  1. Anonymous replied:

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but I thought butter (milchig) in a chicken dish (fleishig) was one of those kosher no-nos. Pareve margarine would be fine, but not real butter.

  2. Renegade Kosher replied:

    Wasn’t how I learned it, but some rules are stricter than others… While I’m not die-hard uber strict (As my own food experimenting shows), I do try to keep to the way I was taught. Which would be chicken & dairy is fine, just no meat (Beef, lamb, or buffallo) & dairy. But, so as to avoid confusion, I will change it for those with stricker rules.

  3. Nadine replied:

    Hi, I found your blog via the Alton Brown LJ (I think). This sounds like a great matzo ball recipe I’ll be sure to try!

  4. Silverbrow replied:

    I have heard of a school of thought that says if one reads the kashrut laws in their literal sense, it might appear that eating poultry and dairy is acceptable. However, I’ve yet to meet anyone that follows this interpretation because it is unclear. Following the safe not sorry route, poultry is considered fleischig and therefore can’t be eaten with any dairy products.

    Anyway, back to the core of this post, I’d strongly recommend you add some fried onion to your kneidlac. I’d wager you’ll never revert to being a non-onion man. My recipe is here.

  5. Renegade Kosher replied:

    Yeah, since writing this I have found the joy of onions… It basically boils down to as -I- evolve culinary-wise, so does the blog & its recipes. I’ve learned so much in just the past 7 months, and I am eagerly lerning more. New ways to prepare dishes, new culinary delights… Culinary school is turning out to be a good thing, as is studying deeper into kashrut law. ^^–>

  6. Steven replied:

    Wasn’t how I learned it, but some rules are stricter than others… While I’m not die-hard uber strict (As my own food experimenting shows), I do try to keep to the way I was taught. Which would be chicken & dairy is fine, just no meat (Beef, lamb, or buffallo) & dairy. But, so as to avoid confusion, I will change it for those with stricker rules.

    I wanted to put in a addendum that since writing this comment, I’ve been slapped on the wrist a few times by my Rabbi. Yes, technically the laws state you could get away with poultry & dairy, but TRADITION is that you don’t mix them. And, as it’s become tradition, it’s now law. Just wanted to give an update at how I’ve learned. See, I -can- be taught!

  7. George replied:

    I love your blog, because I’m searching for unique articles, and good content, what I’m interested in.
    Congrats!

  8. joanna "the Baker" smyth replied:

    I tried adding some of these to mine and it wasnt the greatest. I will try again!

  9. Mary "The Cooking Queen" Masterson replied:

    I love the way this is coming out. The information provided helped me understand a little more the process so i will try it tomorrow. My son is visiting from Boston for the holidays so maybe we can do it together. Some family time.

  10. house music replied:

    wow fine info, I am waiter, but we are going to try this one:))))

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