Salad & a Movie?

Living by the border, this latest Kashrut alert hit close to home. Mazola “Right Blend” Canola Oil, which is distributed in Mexico, bears an unauthorized OU symbol. It is being withdrawn from the marketplace. Consumers spotting this product are requested to contact the Orthodox Union directly.

So, I’m sitting here watching Kadosh, which is a really good movie. But, it has a tidbit about cooking that I find odd… Apparently, to make tea on Shabbat, Orthodox & Hassidic pour the water into the cup first, then add the sugar. Because, apparently, pouring hot water over sugar is cooking, thus not allowed on Shabbat. So, my query to my more torah-learned readers, is would this be also how you would make coffee? Surely you couldn’t be it, but if you poured hot water into a cup, then added instant coffee, sugar, and creamer, would THAT be okay on Shabbat? Ah, the musings I come up with…

Ah, watching this movie has me pondering what recipe I can post with this article. After all, we all know I can’t just post a blurb. Well, I can, but it’s not right! Anyhow, I have a friend who is dieting, and he wanted a recipe for something he can eat for lunches while not going unhealthy. An easy lunch for work, if you will. Contemplating, I came up with this healthy salad idea, and called it Dieter’s Salad. Let’s make it, shall we?

First, take 2 Cups Fresh Spinach Leaves and combine them in a bowl with 1/4 Cup Green Onions, Chopped Finely. Once mixed, take two smaller sealable containers and split the spinach & onions between them. These sealable containers are going to be what you’ll take your lunches in. Next, we need 1/2 pd. Cooked Chicken Breast Strips. If you wish, you can use turkey strips or another form of protien for the salad. Even Tofu strips works well! Anyhow, put 1/4 cup of your protien in the center of each sealable container atop the spinach & green onions. Finally, prepare the following: 1 Banana, Peeled & Sliced; 1 Large Pink Grapefruit, Peeled & Sectioned; 1 Cup Cherry Tomatos, Sliced in Half; and 1/2 Cup Celery. Sprinkle these atop the salad, and seal your containers. Before eating, shake the container to mix up all the ingredients, then top with a low-calorie or fat-free dressing.

The above salad will make two lunches in a row for you, so you can Hypothetically have your lunches from Monday thru Thursday, then mabye treat yourself with a sensible lunch on Fridays for a reward. Note, sensible does NOT mean the All-You-Can-Eat Beef Ribs place down the street from work! It means like a sandwich rap or something with lemonade to drink! Anyhow, those that eat healthy are likely applauding that I can actually do SOMETHING that’s not a dessert or dripping in cheese. Ah, well. Until next time, Shalom and Good Cooking!

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November 16, 2006. Jewish Links, Kashrut Alerts, recipes, salad.

One Comment

  1. Debbie replied:

    “Apparently, to make tea on Shabbat, Orthodox & Hassidic pour the water into the cup first, then add the sugar. Because, apparently, pouring hot water over sugar is cooking, thus not allowed on Shabbat. So, my query to my more torah-learned readers, is would this be also how you would make coffee?”

    This stringency is mainly from the standpoint that Orthodox Jews do not want others to see us perform an act that looks like cooking. This concept is to prevent either the observer to think that the person performing the action is breaking Shabbat or that it is ok to cook and therefore cause the observer to break Shabbat. Therefore, Orthodox Jews make it obvious that they aren’t actually cooking anything.

    Cooking requires adding heat to something. Placing hot water onto the sugar would be adding heat to the sugar. Putting sugar into the hot water is not adding heat to the hot water and, therefore, not considered a normal method of cooking. And this would apply to coffee as well.

    A lot of Orthodox Jews use a method where they pour the hot water from the hot water vessel, into an intermediary cup, and then into the cup that will be used to drink from. This provides the water time to cool (albeit not by much), but most people do not cook with water that has already started to cool. So it won’t look like cooking to most observers.

    The laws are pretty complicated, I agree.

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